The Tales of Niyati Rawal, a Japanese MEXT Undergraduate Scholarship Recipient from India — Part IV

Niyati Rawal is one of the most inspiring and intelligent young women that I know. Not only did she move to Japan at the age of 19 to spend one year studying Japanese intensively before pursuing a Mechanical Engineering, Bachelor of Engineering degree at Osaka University, but she also published articles and conducted presentations about Artificial Intelligence (AI). Needless to say, Niyati is a high achieving, intriguing, and most importantly, warm-hearted person with a bright future.  

In this fourth article, learn more about Niyati’s papers, publications, and presentations.


Niyati’s Papers, Publications, and Presentations

At the Human Agent Interaction Conference in 2017, Niyati presented about neural networks and pattern recognition. Specifically, she shared how when we are born, we only focus on individual parts of the face, and begin to look at the face in a triangular manner as we grow old.

Niyati studied these phenomena through computational modeling of neural networks to explain the underlying mechanisms behind patterns that develop over time. Basically, she wanted to know what part of the face is important to understand emotions, and what specifically is important with recognizing head orientation.


Please enjoy reviewing her papers, publications, and conference presentations about cognitive developmental robotics.

1. Peer-Reviewed International Conferences (Short Paper)

Yukie Nagai and Niyati Rawal, “Where and Why Infants Look: A recurrent neural network for the development of visual attention,” in Proceedings of the 21st Biennial International Congress on Infant Studies, accepted, June 30-July 3, 2018. 

2. Peer-Reviewed International Conferences (Short Paper) 

Niyati Rawal, Takato Horii, and Yukie Nagai, “How does visual attention to face develop in infancy?: A computational account,” in Proceedings of the HAI 2017 Workshop on Representation Learning for Human and Robot Cognition, October 17, 2017.

3. Non-Reviewed Domestic Conferences

Niyati Rawal and Yukie Nagai, “Computational Modeling Approach to Investigate the Development of Scan Paths in Infants,” The 6th Symposium of Japanese Society of Developmental Neuroscience, p. 26, November 25-26, 2017.

Now that we have established Niyati’s hardworking nature, her resiliency to overcome challenges, and her ability to take on challenging tasks such as presenting at an international conference as a young undergraduate student, let’s learn more about her unique vision for her future career, and the ‘why’ that drives her.

Source: https://www.sony.co.jp/united/curiosity-la...